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What Is Form I-90?2023-01-23T07:28:20-05:00
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What Is Form I-90?

The longer name for this is Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card (Green Card). You should use this form to replace your green card (also called a “permanent resident card”), when you need a new one for any reason. You should apply for a replacement green card if yours is expiring soon, lost, damaged, or any other reason which we will cover below. In this article we will use the term “green card” to refer to the permanent resident card.

According to USCIS, if you submit a document with information in a foreign language, you must also submit an English translation. Some documents people might need for form I-90 are these:

You can order a certified translation of these documents from our online store:

Order Your Certified Translation

In this guide we will cover several questions about Form I-90:

When Should I Use Form I-90?

The most common reasons to use Form I-90 are when your green card has been lost, stolen, destroyed or will expire soon. There are other situations when Form I-90 should be used to replace your green card which we will detail below:

  • Your green card has been lost, stolen or damaged.
  • Your green card has already expired or will expire within the next 6 months.
  • Your green card contains any incorrect information. Examples might be a misspelling of your name, or an incorrect date of birth.
  • If you obtained your green card before you were 14 years old and you are now 14 or older.
  • You were a permanent resident with commuter status, but now you actually have a residence in the U.S.
  • You were a permanent resident living in the U.S., but you’ve now switched to commuter status.
  • Your status has been automatically converted to permanent resident status.
  • You have an outdated version of the Alien Registration Card which is no longer valid such as Form AR-3, Form AR-103, or Form I-151.
  • You have legally changed your name or any other biographic information that is listed on your green card so it no longer matches the details of your life.
  • You never received the green card the USCIS issued to you.

When Should I Not Use Form I-90?

If you have a conditional green card which only lasts for 2 years, then you should not use Form I-90 to receive your permanent green card.

This could be possible if you were married for less than 2 years when you got your green card. USCIS gives this 2-year green card to newlyweds to make sure their marriage will last for a long time. If you have a 2-year, conditional green card, you will need to use Form I-751. That form allows you to remove the conditions of your residence in the U.S.

You might also have a 2-year conditional green card if you are an entrepreneur. In that case you would use Form I-829 to remove the conditions of your residence in the U.S.

When Should Conditional Green Card Holders Use Form I-90?

This could potentially seem confusing, however there are times when a person with a 2-year conditional green card needs to use Form I-90. They just need to understand that Form I-90 will not give them their permanent green card.

If you have a 2-year conditional green card, you may still need to use Form I-90 in the following situations:

  • If your 2-year conditional green card has been lost, stolen, or damaged.
  • If your 2-year conditional green card contains any incorrect information such as a misspelling of your name, or an incorrect date of birth.
  • You have legally changed your name or any other biographic information that is listed on your 2-year conditional green card so it no longer matches the details of your life.
  • You never received the previous 2-year conditional green card the USCIS issued to you.

Where Do I File Form I-90?

Generally, you have two different ways to file Form I-90. Those are online or by mail in physical, paper form.

NOTE: You cannot file online if you are applying for a fee waiver.

If you are filing online:

  1. You will need to create a USCIS account online.
  2. Fill out the actual PDF Form I-90.
  3. Upload your supporting documents.
  4. Pay your filing fees at pay.gov, which the system will guide you through.
  5. Make sure all your information is accurate, and submit your form.

If you are filing a paper application by mail:

  1. Print out Form I-90 and fill it in with black ink.
  2. Pay the filing fees by check or money order. If you are paying by credit card, fill out Form G-1450, Authorization For Credit Card Transactions.
  3. Include your supporting documents.
  4. Mail your application and payment.

If you are sending your Form I-90 by the US postal service, use this address:

USCIS
Attn: I-90
P.O. Box 21262
Phoenix, AZ 85036-1262

If you are sending your Form I-90 using a delivery service such as FedEx, UPS, or DHL, use this address:

USCIS
Attn: I-90 (Box 21262)
1820 E. Skyharbor Circle S
Suite 100
Phoenix, AZ 85034-4850

What Documents Do I Need To Provide With Form I-90?

The documents you need to provide along with Form I-90 depend on the reason you need a new green card. Do not send original documents unless you are told specifically to do so in a form. Send copies! We will list the documents needed for each scenario below:

If your green card has been lost, stolen or damaged, include these documents:

    • Copy of your current or most recent green card.
    • OR, if you cannot obtain a copy of your green card, include a copy of a government-issued form of ID that includes your name, date of birth, a photograph of you and your signature.

If your green card has already expired or will expire within the next 6 months, include these documents:

  • Copy of your expiring green card.

If your green card contains any incorrect information. (Examples might be a misspelling of your name, or an incorrect date of birth.) Include these documents:

  • Copy of your current or most recent green card.
  • The relevant legal documents that show the correct biographical information.

If you obtained your green card before you were 14 years old, and you are now 14 or older, include these documents:

  • Copy of your current or most recent green card.

If you were a permanent resident with commuter status, but now you actually have a residence in the U.S., include these documents:

  • Copy of your current or most recent green card.
  • Evidence of your residence in the U.S. such as a utility bill in your name. (If this evidence is in your spouse’s or parent’s name, then include a copy of your original marriage or birth certificate.)

If you were a permanent resident living in the U.S., but you’ve now switched to commuter status, include these documents:

  • Copy of your current or most recent green card.
  • Evidence of your employment which reflects a date within the last 6 months.

If your status has been automatically converted to permanent resident status, include these documents:

  • Evidence of your temporary residence status.
  • Copy of a government-issued form of ID that includes your name, DOB, a photograph of you, and your signature.

If you have an outdated version of the Alien Registration Card which is no longer valid such as Form AR-3, Form AR-103, or Form I-151, include these documents:

  • Copy of your outdated green card.

If you have legally changed your name or any other biographic information that is listed on your green card so it no longer matches the details of your life, include these documents:

  • Copy of your current or most recent green card.
  • The relevant legal documents that show the correct biographical information.

If you never received the green card the USCIS issued to you, include these documents:

  • Copy of your current or most recent green card.
  • Copy of a government-issued form of ID that includes your name, DOB, a photograph of you, and your signature.

Should My Documents Be Translated Into English?

Yes, according to USCIS, if you submit a document with information in a foreign language, you must also submit an English translation.To guarantee that your I-90 is processed as quickly as possible, it helps to use a certified translator.

You may need the following documents translated if you need a new green card because you have legally changed your name or any other biographic information on your green card. Or, if your green card contains any incorrect information, you may need these documents:

You can order a certified translation of these documents from our online store:

Order Your Certified Translation

How Much Does Form I-90 Cost?

The highest possible cost for Form I-90 is at total $540.

This cost for Form I-90 is a combination of the form fee, and the biometrics services fee.

  • Form Fee: $455
  • Biometrics Services Fee: $85

However, the cost for your Form I-90 depends on your situation. Sometimes you will only have to pay the biometrics fee and not the form fee.

You will pay $0 in these situations:

  • You never received the green card the USCIS issued to you.
  • Your existing card has incorrect data because of a DHS error.

How Do I Pay for Pay For Form I-90?

  • If you are paying online: Pay your filing fees at pay.gov, which the system will guide you through.
  • If you are paying the filing fees by check or money order: Make the check or money order payable to “U.S. Department of Homeland Security”
  • If you are paying by credit card: Fill out Form G-1450, Authorization For Credit Card Transactions.

Can I Have The Fee Waived For Form I-90?

You may be eligible for a fee waiver, which would mean you don’t have to pay anything. You can apply for a fee waiver by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver. You will also need to provide evidence to show why you cannot afford the fee.

How Long Does Form I-90 Take To Process?

The processing time for Form I-90 is usually between 1 and 11.3 months. You can check the USCIS processing times website to see the most updated information.

How Should I Fill Out My Form I-90?

There are several different parts of Form I-90. USCIS created an instructional PDF to help you fill in each section, but we will go over them in a simple way below.

Let’s begin with some things which are true for the whole application.

  • If a question does not apply to you, write “N/A”. Don’t just leave the space empty.
  • If there is a question which needs a number as a response, but you need to answer “0”, you should write the word “None”.

If you are filling the application on paper.

  • Write in black ink!
  • If you need extra space, use section 8. If you still need extra space, attach a sheet of paper. Specify the page number, part number, and item number of the application that your extra piece of paper refers to. On every sheet you attach: Write or print your name clearly. Write your Alien Registration Number (if you have one). Sign and date.

From here on, we will go over the specific parts of the application.

PART 1: Information About You

  • Alien Registration Number: also called “A – number”. This 9 digit number is printed on your green card.
  • USCIS Online Number: if you have one. This is a 12 digit number. To find this number you can log in to your account and it should be on your profile page.
  • Legal Name Change: If your name has changed since you received your last green card, you should check the box “yes”. Then, include the document which proves your name has legally changed. For example, a divorce certificate, or marriage certificate.
  • Mailing Address: This is where you want your green card to be mailed. If you will be the person receiving the mail, write your own name in the box that reads “In Care Of Name”.
  • You can have your new green card mailed to an address that’s different from where you live. If so, there is a box that reads “In Care Of Name”. In this place you will write the name of the person who will get your mail.
  • Physical Address: If you live at the same location as the mailing address, you will write “N/A”. If you live somewhere different from the mailing address, you will write that address in this section.
  • Note: USCIS will only mail a green card to a valid U.S. mailing address.
  • Note For Alien Commuters: If you are an alien commuter who lives in a place like Mexico or Canada, you can give a foreign mailing address. If so, you will have to fill out the section 2.h.1 and 2.h.1.a.
  • Class of Admission (Number 14): This is the part of your green card that says “Category”. It will usually be a combination of letters and numbers like “IR1”, “DV2”, “RE8”, or something similar.

PART 2: Application Type

First you will choose if you are one of the three following categories:

  1. Lawful Permanent Resident
  2. Permanent Resident In Commuter Status
  3. Conditional Permanent Resident

Then you will go to section A or B depending on your choice. Either way, this is the part of the application where you are indicating why you need a new green card. Some common reasons might be that your card was lost, stolen, or expiring.

PART 3: Processing Information

  • Item 1: This is where you applied for your visa or adjustment of status. The answer will usually be the physical location of the U.S. Consulate, U.S. Embassy, or USCIS office where you filed your application.
  • Item 2: The physical location of the U.S. Consulate, U.S. Embassy, or USCIS office where your visa was granted. This is probably the same as the answer for item 1.
  • Item 3a: Your “destination in the United States” is where you planned to live or stay when you first came to the U.S.
  • Item 3.a.1.: Your “Port of Entry” is the city you entered the U.S. through. For example, if your plane landed at JFK airport, your port-of-entry would be “Queens, New York”.
  • Items 4 & 5: If you answer “yes” to items 4 or 5, you should speak with an attorney before completing Form I-90.

PART 4: Accommodations for Individuals With Disabilities and/or Impairments

This part of the application allows you to seek assistance if you have an impairment or disability. For example, if you are deaf or have difficulty hearing, blind or have difficulty seeing, or you are unable to travel.

In any of these cases USCIS can potentially offer assistance such as a sign language interpreter or oral test rather than a written one. USCIS may even visit you in your home or in the hospital if you cannot travel.

PARTS 5,6 & 7

These sections are fairly clear and instructions should be followed closely. If you had the help of an interpreter, this is where they would give their information. If you had the help of an attorney, this is where you would give their information.

PART 8

As mentioned above, If you need extra space, use section 8. If you still need extra space, attach a sheet of paper. Specify the page number, part number, and item number of the application that your extra piece of paper refers to.

On every sheet you attach: Write or print your name clearly. Write your Alien Registration Number (if you have one). Sign and date.

What Should I Do After I File Form I-90?

After USCIS receives your Form I-90 application, they will send you updates in the mail and on your online account.

You should receive a letter that USCIS has begun to process your application. If so, USCIS will send you a letter to appear for a biometric services appointment. This letter will tell you the address and time where you should appear.

If USCIS needs more information about your situation they might make a Request for Evidence. This evidence will be required by a certain time. Make sure to provide this evidence before the stated deadline.

After all of this, you should receive a letter denying or approving your Form I-90.

How Can I Check The Status of My Form I-90?

When you receive your letter from USCIS acknowledging that they have received your Form I-90, it will have a combination of letters and numbers that is 13 characters long. This is your “receipt number”.

Enter this receipt number in the USCIS Case Status Tool to see any updates regarding your application.

It is always important to do your own research. Check the USCIS website and the National Visa Center website to see if you are eligible to file a green card application. U.S. Language Services LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. As a result, it is not a substitute for legal counsel. If you need assistance submitting your paperwork, please seek out the advice of a lawyer.

U.S. Language Services LLC is not affiliated with or endorsed by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) or any other agency of the United States government.

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A certified translation is a word-for-word translation required for official use by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), universities, colleges, state or federal institutions and courts.

All our certified translations are issued in accordance with the regulations established by the USCIS, the institution that most frequently requires this type of document. A certified translation includes a certificate issued on our corporate letterhead signed by the translator and a U.S. Language Services representative in PDF format.

How much does it cost?2021-04-13T11:31:37-04:00

The price for a certified translation is $29.00 per page. No hidden fees.
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How are the pages counted?2022-06-28T09:54:53-04:00

When you order a certified translation, the most significant variable is how the pages of the document are calculated. We take into consideration both the number of physical pages in your original document and the total word count.

Each page may contain up to 250 words. Pages may be letter size (8.5″ x 11″), A4 or smaller and one sided.

For example: A project with 2 physical pages that each contain 500 words (1,000 words total), is calculated as 4 pages (1,000 words ÷ 250 = 4 pages).

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For most common languages, including Spanish, French, Portuguese, Russian and Chinese, you can expect to receive a 1-3 page translation in 1 business day. Larger projects (4 – 10 pages) can take up to 3 business days.

For orders in other language pairs, our team will review your documents and provide you with the delivery date once you place your order.

Note: Orders placed after 2 p.m. EST (Eastern Standard Time) will be processed by our team on the following business day. Delivery dates exclude weekends & holidays. 

Do you offer notarized translations?2021-11-10T14:29:32-05:00

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How much does it cost?2020-11-12T06:22:39-05:00

The price for a standard translation is $0.12 per word. No hidden fees.
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Is there a minimun?2020-11-11T11:10:45-05:00

Yes. The minimum per project is $24 or 200 words.

What is a standard translation?2020-11-11T11:14:07-05:00

A standard translation is a high-quality, professional translation of documents or text-based files delivered in an editable Word file. If you require a different format (pages, rtf, txt) just let us know when placing your order using the comments field. This service is perfect for:

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Our translators have years of experience in the translation industry and specialize in different areas of service. Many of them have graduate degrees and certificates in fields such as marketing, law and engineering. We’re very selective and accept less than 10% of the translators that apply.

A typical translator working for U.S. Language Services has over 5 years of experience and is fluent or bilingual in English and the source or target language.

What languages do you translate?2022-03-21T11:43:14-04:00

U.S. Language Services provides translation services in 35 languages. We translate both from English and into English:

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How long will it take?2021-06-07T18:46:35-04:00

For most common languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish you can expect to receive:

  • A 500 word translation in 1 business day
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For orders in other language pairs, our team will review your documents and provide you with the delivery date once you place your order.

Note: Orders placed after 2 p.m. EST (Eastern Standard Time) will be processed by our team on the following business day. Delivery dates exclude weekends & holidays.

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